WELLBEING

Natural

St. Vincent & the Grenadines is home to some notable spas that make use of the natural environment. At St. Vincent’s Buccament Bay Resort guests can enjoy an outdoors massage in a Thai pavilion or under a beach gazebo.

One of the most popular wellness breaks of all across the Caribbean is The BodyHoliday at Le Sport, Saint Lucia which has carved out a highly successful niche by offering holidays that promise to rejuvenate body and mind. The resort had a £10 million renovation last year.

Antigua has a number of highly-rated spas across the island including Galley Bay’s Indulge Spa with tree house treatment rooms and Blue Spa at Carlisle Bay. Located in its own two-storey pavilion it may be set in the Antiguan rainforest but its interior is fiercely contemporary; it is designed by Mary Fox Linton.

Peter Island in the British Virgin Islands reports a 25% increase in guests coming to the spa (April – June 2012) with demand from not only female guests, but male guests and couples’ treatments. It also has a spa with Ayurvedic doctors on staff. It also reports more children using the spa, which is a general trend. Jumby Bay on Antigua for example, has a children’s Junior Spa Menu ( for ages four to 16 years) as part of its RoseBuds programme.

Wellness

Wellness through nature, where environment is an aid to treatment is becoming key in the Caribbean. There is a demand for resort spas to offer indigenous treatments and ingredients and a rejection of air-conditioned, windowless treatment rooms playing nature music on an iPod. The Living Spa at Strawberry Hill in Jamaica is a good example of bringing nature in, as too is the island’s Rainforest Spa at The Jalousie Plantation, Sugar Beach.

Viceroy Anguilla also has an impressive spa housed in a two-storey luxury villa overlooking the Caribbean. It addresses ‘whole-person health’ through curated wellness experiences founded on the fundamental principles of balance, breath and beauty.

Across the Caribbean, there’s an increase in wellbeing courses that tackle particular problems. LaSource on Grenada has a Sleep School Retreat. The Jungle Bay Resort and Spa in Dominica hosts week-long bootcamps for guests looking to combine a Caribbean holiday with intense workouts in the rain forest. And the revered Shambhala Retreat at Parrot Cay in Turks & Caicos offers five-day retreats led by visiting masters versed in yoga or Pilates.

Spas

A holiday in the Caribbean is synonymous with indulgence and pampering and in recent years the region has responded to the demand for world-class spas. No luxury resort is complete without one but that said, each delivers a very individual and unique experience. The tropical backdrop often provides stunning settings with treatment areas open to the elements and wonderful outdoor relaxation areas.

There’s everything from private, single treatment rooms perched on a jetty or hidden away in the rainforest through to the glitz and glamour of legendary spas at resorts such as Sandy Lane in Barbados and the Carlisle Bay Blue Spa in Antigua.

Every spa will offer individually tailored treatments to suit the needs of the guests, using a combination of local and international products along with relaxing and healing therapies. Often home-grown products such as exotic fruit, ginger, nutmeg, natural sea salt, sugar cane and local honey will feature in signature treatments.

Increasing emphasis is also being placed on holistic wellness, rejuvenation and balancing the senses. Alongside massage and beauty treatments, yoga, meditation, pilates and Tai Chi classes are widely available.

There is no doubt that spas and holistic activities like yoga are becoming increasingly mainstream part of a Caribbean holiday. Spas are becoming even more sophisticated, both in design and the scope of treatments offered.

Spa goers are increasingly looking for a more therapeutic experience with a greater focus on the health benefits of a stay. Many spas are learning how to integrate treatments with special diets and nutritional advice, alongside a choice of activities.

There is a demand for resort spas to offer indigenous treatments and ingredients and a rejection of air-conditioned, windowless treatment rooms playing nature music on an iPod.

Across the Caribbean, there’s an increase in wellbeing courses that tackle particular problems. The Jungle Bay Resort and Spa in Dominica hosts weeks-long bootcamps for guests looking to combine a Caribbean holiday with intense workouts in the rain forest. And the revered Shambala Retreat at Parrot Cay in Turks & Caicos Islands offers five-day retreats led by visiting masters versed in yoga or pilates.

Cocoa bean facials and Ayurveda may not immediately spring to mind when you think of the Caribbean but these islands have some of the absolute best spas in the world!

There’s no doubt that spas and holistic activities like yoga are becoming an increasingly mainstream part of a Caribbean holiday. Spas are becoming ever more sophisticated, both in design and the scope of treatments offered. In some cases well-being is the entire raison d’etre for the holiday.

Spa goers are increasingly looking for a more therapeutic experience with a greater focus on the health benefits of a stay. Many spas are learning how to integrate treatments with special diets and nutritional advice, alongside a choice of activities.

There is a demand for resort spas to offer indigenous treatments and ingredients and a rejection of air-conditioned, windowless treatment rooms playing nature music on an iPod

Across the Caribbean, there’s an increase in wellbeing courses that tackle particular problems. The Jungle Bay Resort and Spa in Dominica hosts weeks-long bootcamps for guests looking to combine a Caribbean holiday with intense workouts in the rain forest. And the revered Shambala Retreat at Parrot Cay in Turks & Caicos Islands offers five-day retreats led by visiting masters versed in yoga or pilates.

Cocoa bean facials and Ayurveda may not immediately spring to mind when you think of the Caribbean but these islands have some of the absolute best spas in the world!

There’s no doubt that spas and holistic activities like yoga are becoming an increasingly mainstream part of a Caribbean holiday. Spas are becoming ever more sophisticated, both in design and the scope of treatments offered. In some cases well-being is the entire raison d’etre for the holiday.

Spa goers are increasingly looking for a more therapeutic experience with a greater focus on the health benefits of a stay. Many spas are learning how to integrate treatments with special diets and nutritional advice, alongside a choice of activities.

As Misia Lina, Wellness Manager at Aman Resorts’ Amanyara in the Turks & Caicos says: “Therapeutic spa treatments with a focus on detoxification are becoming more important. On a Caribbean island, we can also utilize the natural rhythm, beauty and space for introspection into our current state of wellness. Here at Amanyara Spa we are focused on new signature journeys that address specific needs including detoxification, relaxation, nurturance, energising and hydration.”

What's new

The new Rainforest Spa at The Jalousie Plantation, Sugar Beach in Saint Lucia features tree house treatment rooms, an Amerindian steam dome, and specialist skin care clinic perched along a lively stream in the lush tropical forest at the base of the World Heritage-listed Pitons. Signature treatments here include bamboo massages, hot rock therapies, Ayurvedic as well as a range of holistic treatments. The Rainforest Spa also makes use of Saint Lucia’s sulphur springs for an exhilarating sulphur mud bath and massage.

Also on Saint Lucia, Hotel Chocolat has opened what must be one of the most unusual spas in the whole of the Caribbean. Inspired by the cocoa plantation on which it is situated, CocoaJuvenate offers treatments with a cocoa bean influence.

On Barbados, Coral Reef has invested heavily in a contemporary stand-alone spa designed by Helen Green Design. A new ‘Body, Mind and Spa’ package focuses on a ‘profound restoration of the body’ and includes four 60-minute spa treatments and a variety of other activities.